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Confederate



These are men which we cannot put into a specfic state or command.


1. Elbert Allison -- Free Colored, See manuscript 3672, page -----. Sept 1864, det. 3rd Regt. Engr. Troops. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

2. Charles Bracken -- Free Colored. 1-321-1 Confederate Archives (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

3. Saml. Ashton-- Colored citizen, Blockade runner. POW Point Lookout, Maryland.
Date of arrival-- Leonardstown, Oct. 2, 1864
Where captured -- Blackstone Id. (island?) Maryland
When captured -- Sept. 16, 1864
Released -- June 19, 1863.
(Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

4. Tom Allen, Laborer 1862, Danville Virginia. See manuscript 5386. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

5. Alvha Vinton, Appears on a receipt roll for pay Sup. Trn ., Picketts Div.
July 28, 1864, Teamster for a period of 2 months, April and May 1864 @ $40.00 a month. Hired from R. Fairfax. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

6. Joe Allen, see manuscript 4793. Ambulance train. Nurse, Oct. 1863, Richmond Virginia. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

7. Isaac Allison, Free colored, Sept, 1864, Detached 3rd Regt, Eng. Troops. See manuscript 3672. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

8. S. Ambler, Colored Engineering Corp, Appears on a register of Jackson hospital, Richmond, Virginia. Admitted April 11, 1865. Turned over to Provost Marshall April, 21, 1865.(Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

9. Ben Asbury -- See manuscript number 5534. Dec 1863 - Jan. 1864. Kinlochs Landing Christ Church, Charleston, South Carolina. (Grave register???) (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

10. William Allen -- Negro. Appears on a register of Jackson Hospital, Richmond Va. Admitted Aug. 5, 1865, Turned over to Provost Marshall, Aug. 12, 1865. Returned to duty. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

11. William Allen -- Free Negro Conscript. Appears on a receipt roll for clothing, Jan. 1, 1865. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

12. Jasper Craig -- Free Negro Conscript. Receipt Roll for clothing 12/29/64(Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

13. Ervin Chevus-- Pvt. Free Negro Conscript. Receipt Roll for clothing June 23, 1864. Detailed (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

14. Hugh Alexander -- Free Negro Conscript. Receipt Roll for clothing 12/29/1864. Ordinance listed as unit then marked out. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

15. George Allen -- Free Negro Conscript. Receipt Roll for clothing, Jan. 1, 1865.
(Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

16. Sam Allen -- Free Negro Conscript. Receipt Roll for clothing, Jan. 1, 1865.
(Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

17. Garnett Anderson - Free Negro. Porter. See manuscript 5820. Jan. 1865. Richmond Virginia.

18. Mike Allen -- Free Negro Conscript. Receipt Roll for clothing, Jan. 1, 1865.
(Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

19. Samuel Allen -- Free Negro laborer. See manuscript 5502. Feb. 65, field depot.

20. Alexander-- Free Negro. See manuscript 5624. June 1863. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

21. Alexander -- Slave. See manuscript 5633. Dec. 1864 (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

22. James Brayboy -- Negro conscript. Receipt for clothing, Jan. 1, 1865.
(Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

23. Thomas Chavis -- Free Negro in Qm & Commsy Depts. Receipt for clothing. Camp Holmes June 24, 1864. Nov. 12, 1864

24. Joe Hassel -- Free Negro Conscript. Appears on a receipt roll for clothing, Oct. 24, 1864 & 12/29/64/ Dist eng. Dept. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

25. John Chavers -- Free Negro Conscript. Jan 1, 1865.

26. Tim Barrett -- Free Negro Conscript. Appears on a receipt roll for clothing, 12/29/64 (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records.)

27 -- Frank Johnson -- Free Negro Conscript. Appears on a receipt roll for clothing, Dec. 31, 1864. Engr Dept.

28. Jenny-- Negro Girl-- Received at the Myrtle Street Prison the 13th day of Feb. 1864 from Peter Coring, US officer. Sent forward from Prov. Mar. Genl on the first day of February 1864. By order of Col. Marsh.

Jenny "negro Girl"
Signed William Lonergan--Keeper
(Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

29. Simon Allen -- Free Negro Conscript. Appears on a receipt roll for clothing Jan. 1, 1865 (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

30. S. Bing -- Free Negro See manuscript 5972 (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

31. May Adams. Slave. Laborer. See manuscript 6381. Jan. -March 1864. Engr. Bureau. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

32. J. J. -- Slave. See manuscript 3933. Sept. 1863. Mfg. Dept, Clothing Bur. Qm. Dept. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

33. R.M. Ayers -- (Evelina slave) Nurse. See manuscript 4765. Jan. 1863 Stauton Va. Card 2 R. M. Ayers, conscript Camp of Instruction/Richmond/Fry Nov. 64. Title of record S. O. 257. (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

34. Henry Bowser -- Free. Nurse Chap. 6, 653, 2, 8 (Confederate Papers Relating to Citizens or Business Firms, 1861-65)

35. Jasper Craig -- Free Negro Conscript appears on a roll for clothing 4th qtr. 1864. Roll number 310. . (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

36. Joe Hasell -- Free Negro Conscript appears on a roll for clothing 4th qtr. 1864. Roll number 310. Date of issue 12/29/64 (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

37. Henson Williams -- unable to find unit in which he served.

38. William Allen, Free Negro conscript appears on a receipt roll for clothing. Jan 1, 1865

39. James Bailey, Free Negro & Teamster appears on a receipt roll for clothing 2nd Q, 186? Dated April 1, 186?
Remarks: Slave roll(?????) ((Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

40. Alexander, Free Negro laborer. See manuscript 5624 June 1863. Possible duplication of # 21? (Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)

41. Simon Allen, free Negro conscript appears on a receipt for clothing Jan. 1, 1865.
(Unfiled Papers and Slips Belonging in Confederate Compiled Service Records)


Documentation only.
42. Negro Confederate Veteran Shot

Dallas, Tex. - June 14. Two Negroes, Henson Williams and his son William were shot dead from ambush in Brazos County, while they were plowing in a field. Officers are searching for a white man who is believed to have shot them. The elder Williams fought through the Civil War as a Confederate soldier and made such a good record that he was made a full member of the Confederate Veteran's camp at Milliken. The old white Confederate soldiers are enraged at the assassination and threaten vengeance on the assassin when captured.

New York Times issue dated 6/15/1900.
http://query.nytimes.com/mem/archive-free/pdf?res=F10B11F7345811738DDDAC0994DE405B808CF1D3
(Source as noted, Checked CWS&S)



43. KENT—A WAR-TIME NEGRO


"An African Morgan—a citizen whose name we shall not mention, although many readers know and will recognize the case—was surprised some days ago by the entrance of a good servant, who was supposed to be, if living at all, in Yankee hands at Knoxville. This servant went cheerfully, of course, or he would not have been sent, to wait on ‘Young Massa,’ who is under Brigadier-General Jenkins, in Longstreet’s corps. "In the retreat from Knoxville, he was accidentally wounded, and necessarily left behind. "When taken to Knoxville, he was questioned by General Foster, well known for his connection as engineer with Fort Sumter, which has done more than he desired or expected for the defense of Charleston. "Being asked his master’s name, the man replied, when General Foster condescendingly said: ‘Oh, yes; I knew him when I was at Sumter. You know that you are now free and have no master.’ We need not report the further conversation, or the conduct of the servant. Suffice it to say he did not—like some of our gossiping friends in uniform—talk to everybody about his intention, but at the first promising opportunity he took French leave of Yankee friends and freedom in Knoxville, and not knowing then where to find or reach his ‘Young Master,’ he struck, according to his best information, for the ‘Old Master’ and the ‘home place.’
"He was compelled to walk over one hundred and fifty miles, and in great part over the route travelled lately by General Morgan, and succeeded in reaching a railroad, which gave him a lift toward this city.
"We would have more such cases if opportunities could be found."

LIFE IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY BEING PERSONAL EXPERIENCES OF A PRIVATE SOLDIER IN THE CONFEDERATE ARMY BY ARTHUR P. FORD
AND SOME EXPERIENCES AND SKETCHES OF SOUTHERN LIFE
BY MARION JOHNSTONE FORD NEW YORK AND WASHINGTON THE NEALE PUBLISHING COMPANY 1905
http://www.researchonline.net/lacw/history/life.pdf


44. "The following is a list of deceased members of Genl. Forrest Staff and Escort
Burl Buchanan colored"
(Nathan Bedford Forrest's escort and staff By Michael R. Bradley p. 174)

45. Bill Simms --
When the war started, my master sent me to work for the Confederate army. I worked most of the time for three years off and on, hauling cannons, driving mules, hauling ammunition and provisions. The Union army pressed in on us and the Rebel army moved back. I was sent home. When the Union army came close enough I ran away and joined the Union army. There I drove six-mule team and worked at wagon work, driving ammunition and all kinds of provisions until the war ended. Then I returned home to my old master, who had stayed there with my mother. My master owned about four hundred acres of good land, and had had ten slaves, Most of the slaves stayed at home. My master hired me to work for him.
Library of Congress

BILL SIMMS, Confederate & Union armies;
enslaved in Missouri, interviewed in Kansa
(Documentation found at http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/maai/emancipation/text6/warsoldierswpa.pdf)

There is one card found that shows service for a Bill Simms as -- Slave. Laborer at Fort Powell. Nov. 1863. This may or may not be the same man.

46. One day Marster Bob comes to me and says, “Jim, how you like to jine de army?” You see, de war had started. I says to him “What does I have to do?” And he says, “Tend hosses and ride ’em.” I was young den and thought it would be lots of fun, so I says I’d go. So de first thing I knows, I’s in de army away off east from here, somewhar dis side of St. Louis and in Tennessee and Arkansas and other places. I goes in de army ’stead of Dr. Carroll. After I gits in de army, it wasn’t so much fun, ’cause tendin’ hosses and ridin’ wasn’t all I done. No, sar, I has to do shootin’ and git shooted at! One time we stops de train, takes Yankee money and lots of other things off dat train. Dat was way up de other side of Tennessee.
You’s heard of de battle of Independence?6 Dat’s whar we fights for three days and nights. I’s not tendin’ hosses dat time. Dey gives me a rifle and sends me up front fightin’, when we wasn’ runnin’. We does a heap of runnin’ and dat suits dis nigger. I could do dat better’n advance. When de order comes to ’treat, I’s all ready.
I gits shot in de shoulder in dat fight and lots of our soldiers gits killed and we loses our supply.

JAMES CAPE, Confederate army;
enslaved in Texas, interviewed in Texas, ca. 1937
(http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/maai/emancipation/text6/warsoldierswpa.pdf)

47. I remember Stonewall Jackson. He was a big man with long whiskers, and very brave. We all fought wid him until his death. “I was young den and thought
it would be lots of fun“ We wan’t beaten. We wuz starved out! Sometimes we had parched corn to eat and sometimes we didn’t have a bite o’ nothin’, because the Union mens come and tuck all the food for their selves. I can still remember part of my ninety years. I remembers we fought all de way from Virginia and winded up in Manassah’s Gap. When time came for freedom most of us wuz glad. We liked the Yankees. They was good to us. “You is all now free.” “You can stay on the plantation or you can go.” We all stayed there until old massa died. Den I worked on de Seaboard Airline [Railroad] when it come to Birmingham. I have been here ever since. In all de years since de war I cannot forget old massa. He was good and kind. He never believed in slavery but his money was tied up in slaves and he didn’t want to lose all he had. I knows I will see him in heaven and even though I have to walk ten miles for a bite of bread I can still be happy to think about the good times we had then. I am a Confederate veteran but my house burned up wid de medals and I don’t get a pension.

GUS BROWN, Confederate army;
enslaved in Virginia, interviewed in Alabama, 1937
(http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/maai/emancipation/text6/warsoldierswpa.pdf)

48. It was this way, Boss, how come me to be in de War. You see, they ’quired all of de slaveowners to send so many niggers to de army to work diggin’ de trenches an’ throwin’ up de breastworks an’ repairin’ de railroads what de Yankees done ’stroyed. Every mars [master] was ’quired to send one nigger for every ten dat he had. Iffen you had er hundred niggers, you had to send ten of dem to de army. I was one of dem dat my mars ’quired to send. Dat was de worst times dat dis here nigger ever seen an’ de way dem white men drive us niggers, it was something awful. De strap, it was goin’ from ’fore day till ’way after night. De niggers, heaps of ’em just fall in dey tracks give out an’ them white men layin’ de strap on dey backs without ceastin’. Dat was zackly way it was wid dem niggers like me what was in de army work. I had to stand it, Boss, till de War was over.

TINES KENDRICKS, Confederate army;
enslaved in Georgia, interviewed in Arkansas, ca. 1937
(http://nationalhumanitiescenter.org/pds/maai/emancipation/text6/warsoldierswpa.pdf)

49. Confederate States Engineer Dept. To Public cemetery.
Nov. 4, 1863.
Interment of fifty two (52) bodies sent from hospital for Negro laborers from Oct. 11 1862 to date at $ 1.62 each. $84.50
Received payment
John D. Brown Superintendant P. C.






101 as of 11/17/11